Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 7.08

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its 23rd year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is a leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Journal Impact Factor™ 7.08 (Clarivate, 2022)) and is also the largest journal in the field. It is indexed in all major literature indices including Medline, PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines, ranking Q1 in both the 'Medical Informatics' and 'Health Care Sciences and Services' categories, it is a selective journal complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Infodemiology and Infoveillance

The incidence of Takotsubo syndrome (TTS), also known as the broken heart syndrome or stress cardiomyopathy, is increasing worldwide. The understanding of its prognosis has been progressively evolving and currently appears to be poorer than previously thought, which has attracted the attention of researchers. An attempt to recognize the awareness of this condition among the general population drove us to analyze the dissemination of this topic on TikTok, a popular short-video–based social media platform. We found a considerable number of videos on TTS on TikTok; however, the quality of the presented information remains unknown.

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Digital Health Reviews

Heart failure (HF) is a common clinical syndrome associated with substantial morbidity, a heavy economic burden, and high risk of readmission. eHealth self-management interventions may be an effective way to improve HF clinical outcomes.

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Digital Health Reviews

Chronic conditions are characterized by their long duration (≥1 year), need for ongoing medical attention, and limitations in activities of daily living. These can often co-occur with depression and anxiety as common and detrimental comorbidities among the growing population living with chronic conditions. Digital health interventions (DHIs) hold promise in overcoming barriers to accessing mental health support for these individuals; however, the design and implementation of DHIs for depression and anxiety in people with chronic conditions are yet to be explored.

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Theme Issue 2022: Chatbots and COVID-19

Despite significant progress in reducing tobacco use over the past 2 decades, tobacco still kills over 8 million people every year. Digital interventions, such as text messaging, have been found to help people quit smoking. Chatbots, or conversational agents, are new digital tools that mimic instantaneous human conversation and therefore could extend the effectiveness of text messaging.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

The COVID-19 pandemic created unprecedented shifts in the way health programs and services are delivered. A national lockdown to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Australia was introduced in March 2020. This lockdown included the closure of exercise clinics, fitness centers, and other community spaces, which, before the pandemic, were used to deliver Beat It. Beat It is an 8-week in-person, community-based, and clinician-led group exercise and education program for adults self-managing diabetes. To continue offering Beat It, it was adapted from an in-person program to a fully web-based supervised group exercise program for adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM).

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Long-term weight loss in people living with obesity can reduce the risk and progression of noncommunicable diseases. Observational studies suggest that digital coaching can lead to long-term weight loss.

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

In obstetric and gynecologic practices, synchronous telehealth services via chat message, voice calls, and video calls have been increasingly equipped to improve patients’ health care accessibility and clinical outcomes. Nevertheless, differences in clinical outcomes between communication tools remain unknown, especially in terms of safety.

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JMIR Theme Issue: COVID-19 Special Issue

There is a lot of misinformation about a potential protective role of nicotine against COVID-19 spread on Twitter despite significant evidence to the contrary. We need to examine the role of vape advocates in the dissemination of such information through the lens of the gatewatching framework, which posits that top users can amplify and exert a disproportionate influence over the dissemination of certain content through curating, sharing, or, in the case of Twitter, retweeting it, serving more as a vector for misinformation rather than the source.

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Theme Issue: Social Media, Ethics, and COVID-19 Misinformation

Improving confidence in and uptake of COVID-19 vaccines and boosters among long-term care workers (LTCWs) is a crucial public health goal, given their role in the care of elderly people and people at risk. While difficult to reach with workplace communication interventions, most LTCWs regularly use social media and smartphones. Various social media interventions have improved attitudes and uptake for other vaccines and hold promise for the LTCW population.

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Digital Pain Assessment and Management

Chronic pelvic pain is a common and disabling condition in women living with endometriosis. Pharmacological and surgical treatments are not always effective at controlling pain and present important restrictions. Digital therapeutics (DTx) are emerging as major nonpharmacological alternatives that aim to extend the analgesic therapeutic arsenal of patients.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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Open Peer Review Period:

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Open Peer Review Period:

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