Journal of Medical Internet Research

The leading peer-reviewed journal for digital medicine and health and health care in the internet age. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria (Canada)

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, MA, FACMI, Professor, Biomedical Informatics and Sociomedical Sciences; Director, Laboratory for Precision Prevention, Columbia University, NY


Impact Factor 7.08

The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) (founded in 1999, now in its 23rd year!), is the pioneer open access eHealth journal and is the flagship journal of JMIR Publications. It is a leading digital health journal globally in terms of quality/visibility (Journal Impact Factor™ 7.08 (Clarivate, 2022)) and is also the largest journal in the field. The journal focuses on emerging technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, telehealth and informatics applications for patient education, prevention, population health and clinical care.

JMIR is indexed in all major literature indices including MEDLINEPubMed/PMCScopus, Psycinfo, SCIE, JCR, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, DOAJ, GoOA and others. As a leading high-impact journal in its disciplines, ranking Q1 in both the 'Medical Informatics' and 'Health Care Sciences and Services' categories, it is a selective journal complemented by almost 30 specialty JMIR sister journals, which have a broader scope, and which together receive over 6.000 submissions a year. 

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, allied health professionals, informal caregivers, and patients alike, and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). Peer-review reports are portable across JMIR journals and papers can be transferred, so authors save time by not having to resubmit a paper to a different journal but can simply transfer it between journals. 

We are also a leader in participatory and open science approaches, and offer the option to publish new submissions immediately as preprints, which receive DOIs for immediate citation (eg, in grant proposals), and for open peer-review purposes. We also invite patients to participate (eg, as peer-reviewers) and have patient representatives on editorial boards.

As all JMIR journals, the journal encourages Open Science principles and strongly encourages publication of a protocol before data collection. Authors who have published a protocol in JMIR Research Protocols get a discount of 20% on the Article Processing Fee when publishing a subsequent results paper in any JMIR journal.

Be a widely cited leader in the digitial health revolution and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Electronic/Mobile Data Capture, Internet-based Survey & Research Methodology

Web-based questionnaire (WBQ) surveys are popular, but the quality of reporting WBQ survey research is uneven and unsatisfactory worldwide. Education and training on WBQ methodology may be necessary. However, the current knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of its methodology remain unknown.

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Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is being increasingly adopted in the health care industry for administrative tasks, patient care operations, and medical research.

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Theme Issue 2022: Chatbots and COVID-19

Chatbots have become a promising tool to support public health initiatives. Despite their potential, little research has examined how individuals interacted with chatbots during the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding user-chatbot interactions is crucial for developing services that can respond to people’s needs during a global health emergency.

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Telehealth and Telemonitoring

Previous studies have demonstrated telemedicine (TM) to be an effective tool to complement rheumatology care and address workforce shortage. With the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, TM experienced a massive upswing. A previous study revealed that physicians’ willingness to use TM and actual use of TM are closely connected to their knowledge of TM. However, it remains unclear which factors are associated with patients’ motivation to use TM.

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Theme Issue 2022: The Present and Future of Pandemic Technologies

This article focuses on how Japan experienced the COVID-19 pandemic. It delineates the various challenges the country faced and the measures the national government took to stop the spread of the infection. The article begins with the author’s personal experience of COVID-19. The second section explains how the Japanese government lacked the legal sanctions to enforce a state of emergency. The third section deals with the current pandemic response as characterized by the increased use of digital technologies to control the spread of the virus. I argue that the lack of effective governance hampered Japan’s timely use of digital technologies. The fourth section will touch on the issues created by the rapid spread of the infection and an increase in the hospitalization rate, focusing on intensive care unit triage and the ethical debates that ensued in Japan. The fifth section discusses the pandemic from the perspective of disaster preparedness and management, exploring the ways the pandemic responses share ethical challenges with responses to other disasters such as earthquakes and typhoons.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

Recently, we were deeply saddened by the findings of the coroner investigating the death of 14-year-old Molly Russell. Deeply saddened and angry but not surprised. This case should be seen as a sentinel event, given that this is the first time social media was directly implicated as a cause of death. We should use this opportunity to advance proposals for the regulations of the health effects of social media.

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JMIR Theme Issue: COVID-19 Special Issue

During the COVID-19 pandemic, as health care services shifted to video- and phone-based modalities for patient and provider safety, the Veterans Affairs (VA) Office of Connected Care widely expanded its video-enabled tablet program to bridge digital divides for veterans with limited video care access.

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Viewpoints and Perspectives

Integrating health and social care delivery with the help of digital technologies is a grand challenge. We argue that previous attempts have largely failed to achieve their objectives because implementers and decision makers disregard the complex socio-organizational dimensions of change associated with initiatives. These include structural and organizational complexity inhibiting the development of shared care pathways; professional jurisdictions, interests, and expertise; and existing data and governance structures. We provide an overview of those dimensions that can inform strategic decisions going forward, thereby contributing to the chances of success of shared care initiatives.

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Cost-Effectiveness and Economics

Virtual care (VC) and remote patient monitoring programs were deployed widely during the COVID-19 pandemic. Deployments were heterogeneous and evolved as the pandemic progressed, complicating subsequent attempts to quantify their impact. The unique arrangement of the US Military Health System (MHS) enabled direct comparison between facilities that did and did not implement a standardized VC program. The VC program enrolled patients symptomatic for COVID-19 or at risk for severe disease. Patients’ vital signs were continuously monitored at home with a wearable device (Current Health). A central team monitored vital signs and conducted daily or twice-daily reviews (the nurse-to-patient ratio was 1:30).

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

There is some initial evidence suggesting that mindsets about the adequacy and health consequences of one’s physical activity (activity adequacy mindsets [AAMs]) can shape physical activity behavior, health, and well-being. However, it is unknown how to leverage these mindsets using wearable technology and other interventions.

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Ethics, Privacy, and Legal Issues

In the nursing home sector, reusing routinely recorded data from electronic health records (EHRs) for knowledge development and quality improvement is still in its infancy. Trust in appropriate and responsible reuse is crucial for patients and nursing homes deciding whether to share EHR data for these purposes. A data governance framework determines who may access the data, under what conditions, and for what purposes. This can help obtain that trust. Although increasing attention is being paid to data governance in the health care sector, little guidance is available on development and implementation of a data governance framework in practice.

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Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

Automatic diagnosis of depression based on speech can complement mental health treatment methods in the future. Previous studies have reported that acoustic properties can be used to identify depression. However, few studies have attempted a large-scale differential diagnosis of patients with depressive disorders using acoustic characteristics of non-English speakers.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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